Things we should really discuss in detail

  1. Other than rope and duct tape, and believe me, I’ve considered both, does anyone have a suggestion for keeping a 2 year-old from slipping out of her 5-point car seat harness? Yes, it is snug, and yes, the clip is at chest level. She still finds a way to free her arms. I think she is removing them, but I can’t be sure.
  2. For those of you who live in older houses with plaster walls, I could use a voice or two of experience on hanging things and heating/cooling issues.
  3. I don’t really consider myself a new parent anymore, which means I am only slightly less of a mess about child-related situations. For example, I didn’t take my daughter to the ER the first time she hit her head on something after Natasha Richardson’s tragic death, I only THOUGHT ABOUT IT. See, I am so much more chill as a parent now. However, I am now parenting a child who used to love vegetables, who would try anything I put on her plate, and who ate a wide variety of foods, and who now seems to hate all edible substances that are not yogurt, apple sauce, breakfast cereal, or pasta. I am concerned about her lack of adventure as an eater, sure, but mostly I am concerned about her nutrition. Should I be? 

4 thoughts on “Things we should really discuss in detail

  1. Hee hee…

    I have totally been there on #1! I wish I could say that I have a fantastic solution for you, but unfortunately I don’t. There were a lot of threats made and a lot of beloved toys taken away during that particular time in Loren’s life!

    I will check with the hubby about #2, as HVAC is his specialty, and get back to you.

    #3 is all too familiar at my house. I am the mother of two very picky eaters. They have chosen the chicken and starch diet for most of their young lives. I think most kids go through this phase (I’ll let you know if mine ever come out of it. :{ ). Sounds like Mia’s choice is due to her new found need to assert her independence. Just keep offering the good stuff to her, she will eventually come around… that is… when it is her idea, of course. In the mean time, our pediatrician suggested giving my kids a multi-vitamin, just to ease my concern I think.

    Good luck!

  2. Alright, first of all, i commend you for not freaking out. We picked up an 8 year old boy the other day on the ambulance who had broken both bones in his arm jumping off of a swing and his mother tearfully proclaimed over and over that this was “her WORST fear for him come true” and I really wanted to turn and say, “your worst fear is a broken arm?”. So not freaking out is a great thing. The only time this little brave boy cried was when he saw his mom crying. He was in the back of the ambulance, I started TWO IV’s in his arm, and he was fine, we bring him out, he sees his mom crying, and BAWLS.

    Second of all I don’t think I ate veggies at all as a child. I ate alot of vitamins. I also did this thing for a while where I cut up the veggies small enough that I could swallow them like pills with my milk. My mom didn’t like that very much. I remember pushing my food around in pre-k so that they would think I ate all of my veggies. And look at me doin triathlons :-). I still dont eat veggies, but I do enjoy a bloody mary!!

    e

  3. My favorite thing to proselytize lately:

    Minimum daily diet
    Dr. Brazelton advises that this “baseline/minimum” program will cover basic nutritional needs during a toddler’s negative period:

    * 1 pint (16 ounces) of milk (or equivalent in dairy products; cheese, yogurt, etc.)
    * 2 ounces of iron-containing protein (meat or egg) or cereals fortified with iron
    * 1 ounce of orange juice or fresh fruit
    * 1 multivitamin (to cover for uneaten vegetables)

    She won’t starve. Some days Beck eats veggie booty and fruit and that’s it. Que sera.

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